Category Archives: science

A trip to the mountains despite a heart condition?

Cardiologists are in agreement that generally exercise in the mountains is a very good way to prevent or reduce the occurrence of cardiovascular diseases. Nevertheless what about those people who have a pre-existing cardiovascular condition? Under what circumstances is it safe for them to reside or holiday in high mountainous regions, and what rules should they apply to their conduct whilst there?

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Calcium may play a role in the development of Parkinson's disease

Researchers have found that excess levels of calcium in brain cells may lead to the formation of toxic clusters that are the hallmark of Parkinson’s disease.

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Illegal global trade of pangolins

Animal traffickers are taking advantage of remote ivory trade routes to smuggle pangolins – one of the world’s most endangered animals – out of Central Africa, a new study has found.

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Scientists shed light on biological roots of individuality

A new study illuminates the biology that guides behavior across different stages of life in worms, and suggests how variations in specific neuromodulators in the developing nervous system may lead to occasional variations.

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Rapid pollution increases may be as harmful to the heart as absolute levels

Rapid increases in pollution may be as harmful to the heart as sustained high levels, according to new research. The authors urgently call for confirmatory studies as even residents of clean air cities could be at risk.

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Beewolves have been successfully using the same antibiotics for 68 million years

Scientists have now found that beewolves, unlike humans, do not face the problem of antibiotic resistant pathogens. These insects team up with symbiotic bacteria which produce up to 45 different antibiotic substances to protect their offspring against mold fungi. This antibiotic cocktail has remained surprisingly stable since the symbiosis emerged, about 68 million years ago.

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Building a DNA barcode library for the Canadian flora using herbarium collections

Researchers have built a DNA barcode library for the vascular plant flora of Canada based entirely on herbarium collections. DNA barcode libraries are important to facilitate plant identification for a variety of studies including analysis and regulation of supplements, food, and environmental or ancient DNA. The scale of the study surpasses previous library-building efforts, providing barcodes for 98 percent of Canada’s vascular plant species (5,076 of 5,190).

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Weeds out of control

Herbicides can no longer control the weeds that threaten crop productivity and food security in the UK because the plants have evolved resistance, and future control must depend on management strategies that reduce reliance on chemicals. So concludes a nationwide epidemiological assessment of the factors that are driving the abundance and spread of the major agricultural weed, black-grass.

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Why base metabolism varies with mass

A multidisciplinary team of researchers has managed to solve a puzzle that had bewildered biologists for over a century: how and why an organism’s base metabolism varies depending on its mass. Base metabolism is the minimum energy that an organism consumes to stay alive.

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New images reveal how the ear's sensory hairs take shape

Our ability to hear relies on tiny bundles of hair-like sensors inside the inner ear. Scientists have identified a key component of the machinery that makes these bundles grow in an orderly fashion.

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